Craig Marcus

Professor
craig.marcus [at] oregonstate.edu

Office: 541-737-1808

Agricultural & Life Sciences

Agricultural & Life Sciences 2116C

2750 SW Campus Way

2750 SW Campus Way
Corvallis, OR 97331

Dr. Craig Marcus received his PhD from the University of Wisconsin-Madison  and conducted post doctoral research at Cornell University and UW-Madison. He has served on the faculty at Purdue University, the University of New Mexico, and is currently  Professor of Toxicology and Department Head for Environmental and Molecular Toxicology at Oregon State University. He has over 35 years of experience in the field of Environmental Toxicology.  His research and teaching focuses on the structure, function and regulation of the cytochromes P450 superfamily, with a current focus on the role of  P450 enzymes in environmentally-induced human diseases. His most recent research focuses on alternative splicing in the P450 super family of enzymes and identifying endogenous substrates of P450s with important cell regulatory functions. Over the past 30 years he has been highly active in the instruction and mentoring of graduate students, post docs and early career faculty. He has developed professional development programs for graduate students, post docs and junior faculty, and currently serves as the Director of the OSU Superfund Research Program Training Core and as PI and Program Director of an EPA Cooperative Training Grant in environmental health sciences.

 

Profile Field Tabs

At OSU
Affiliated with: 
Enviro / Molecular Toxic
Courses Taught: 

Instructional Activities Oregon State University

TOX 411/511        Environmental and Molecular Toxicology (3 cr)  Introduction to Molecular and Environmental Toxicology.  Basic principles of toxicology and environmental chemistry focusing on the distribution and fate of chemicals in the environment, toxicokinetics of absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion of xenobiotics.  (Fall Term: 2008, 2009 (2 lectures) (Spring term; 2011 (2 lectures)   (Spring Term 2012 – 4 lectures), (Spring 2013 – 4 lectures), (Spring 2014-3 lectures); (Spring 2015 - 3 lectures); Spring 2016 - 4 lectures; Spring 2017 - 4 lectures; Spring 2018 4 lectures; Spring 2019 3 lectures)

TOX 512                Target Organ Toxicology (4 cr)  Basic Principles of toxicology, ADME and target organ toxicology with a focus on AOP (Adverse Outcome Pathways.  Fall 2105 – assumed leadership responsibility for course, developed a new syllabus and increased course from 3 to 4 cr.  Added additional student centered experiential learning aspects to the course.  Course coordinator and primary instructor: Fall  Term 2015; 2016, 2017; Winter 2019).

TOX 513                Environmental and Molecular Toxicology (3 cr)  (2 lectures)   Mechanism of organ specific toxicity due to tissue specific bioactivation of xenobiotics, oxidative stress and depletion of cellular protective pathways. (Spring Term, 2009, 2010).  Spring Term 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018, 2019: – 1 lecture – Risk Analysis of GMO crops.

TOX 455/555       Ecotoxicology: Aquatic Ecosystems (3 cr). This course is an introduction to ecotoxicology, the science of contaminants in the biosphere and their effects on constituents of the biosphere, including humans. The course provides a general survey of environmental toxicology and risk assessment from an ecological vantage.  Chemical Uptake, Transformation, Elimination, Accumulation.  (Spring  2011; 2012;   2-4 lectures/yr), (Spring 2013 – 4 lectures; Winter 2014, 2 lectures)

TOX 575                Advanced Xenobiotic Metabolism and Transporters (2 cr) Revised Graduate Elective Course. Course organizer and primary instructor, with Dr. Larry Curtis and Dr. Andrew Annalora.  Fall, 2016 and Spring 2018.

TOX 607               Toxicology “Seminar” – weekly 1 hour student centered active learning course. Discussion, critical thinking and analysis, writing skills.  Taught based on current topics from current topics in the fields of environmental chemistry and molecular toxicology.  All doctoral students must attend every term in residence in the Toxicology graduate program.  Fall term 2012:  Course coordinator and instructor.  Term topic – Human and Environmental Safety of GMO crops.  Spring Term 2013 – Grant Writing and Reviewing Workshop; Fall Term 2014 –Grant writing workshop (with Dr. Harper); Grant Writing Workshop with Dr. Jennifer Field, Winter 2017)

TOX 699               Integrated Environmental and Molecular Toxicology I: Core Toxicology Graduate Course, part I).  Winter Term 2011 2 lectures; Fall Term 2013, 6 lectures).

TOX 699               Integrated Environmental and Molecular Toxicology II:  Core Toxicology Graduate Course, part II).  Spring  Term 2011 2 lectures; Spring  Term 2012, 2 lectures – xenobiotic metabolism, pharmacokinetics and dose-response.

PH 101                   Public Health (2 cr)  (1 lecture)  Introduction to Toxicology.  Overview of the basic concepts in modern toxicology and risk assessment.  Discussion of how toxicology plays an important role in the every day life of the average consumer.  (Spring Term, 2009; Winter Term 2010.)

PH  591                  Public Health  (2 cr) (Public Health Policy and Politics H 491 / H 591).  Moderator for one lecture/discussion session on  Water Quality and Adequacy. (Spring term, 2009, 2010)

GRAD 520            Responsible Conduct of Research (Fall term, 2009, 2010, 2011, and Every academic term since Fall 2012:  (1 cr)  1 lecture on the responsible conduct of research with a  focus on research collaborations and authorship.

 

PHAR 735              (Foundations of Drug Action – OSU College of Pharmacy)  Four lectures on Pharmaceutical Toxicity.  Pharmacokinetics and toxicology of drugs.   Fall, 2011, guest lecturer)

Professional Development Colloquium: (2008-2009; 2012; 2013, 2014; 2016) (Described also under “Instructional Innovations”). A Grantsmanship and Early Career Mentoring Workshop for new faculty and graduate students.   

Professional Development Colloquium: (Spring 2018 (8 hrs):  Course Content: This course is an introduction to social justice: what it is, why we are focused on it at OSU, and what students should hope to accomplish by looking at their work from a perspective of social justice.

Biography

 

Dr. Craig Marcus received his PhD from the University of Wisconsin-Madison  and conducted post doctoral research at Cornell University and UW-Madison. He has served on the faculty at Purdue University, the University of New Mexico, and is currently  Professor of Toxicology and Department Head for Environmental and Molecular Toxicology at Oregon State University. He has over 35 years of experience in the field of Environmental Toxicology.  His research and teaching focuses on the structure, function and regulation of the cytochromes P450 superfamily, with a current focus on the role of  P450 enzymes in environmentally-induced human diseases. His most recent research focuses on alternative splicing in the P450 super family of enzymes and identifying endogenous substrates of P450s with important cell regulatory functions. Over the past 30 years he has been highly active in the instruction and mentoring of graduate students, post docs and early career faculty. He has developed professional development programs for graduate students, post docs and junior faculty, and currently serves as the Director of the OSU Superfund Research Program Training Core and as PI and Program Director of an EPA Cooperative Training Grant in environmental health sciences.

 

My Publications

I currently have no publications listed within this site.